Rolling @ TAG – The Artground

Artground

Rolling @ TAG

Rolling @ TAG

By Daiya Aida | 19th April – 19th August 2018

About the Arts Space
Rolling @ TAG is an interactive children’s arts space which encourages spontaneous play and aims to cultivate an environment that prompts children to take ownership of the space and feel comfortable to create their own versions of ‘play’. There are various interactive elements at play as well, – simple electronics that create sounds and lights when triggered and microphones that pick up your voice and sound them through various speakers in the space. The unique feature of this space is the fact that there are no rules about how you can or should experience the space. Rolling @ TAG’s original concept was conceived by Yamaguchi Center for Arts and Media [YCAM]
About the artist
Daiya Aida, a Japanese artist, received his MA in Media Culture and Communication from Institute of Advanced Media Arts and Sciences (IAMAS) in 2003. He worked as a Chief Educator of Yamaguchi Center of Arts and Media [YCAM] from 2003 to 2014 and was the head of the media educational program research / development where he produced original workshops for YCAM that deal with media technology and media society. He curated “glitchGROUND” – a YCAM education exhibition (2012), and had conducted media workshops such as “Walking around Surround” at Spell on You exhibition, Media City Seoul (2012). In creating Rolling @ TAG, Daiya Aida was supported by his team comprising of Clarence Ng and Yushin Suzuki.

What’s in Rolling @ TAG
The inspiration behind Rolling @ TAG

Rolling at TAG is inspired by Korogaru which was designed by Daiya in 2012. Since Korogaru’s first debut in Yamaguchi Center of Arts and Media [YCAM], it has gone through 5 editions, consisting of both indoor and outdoor play areas throughout Japan. This is the first time Korogaru will be debuting outside of Japan! We are inspired by the outcomes of Korogaru’s success with the Japanese children and hope to replicate these outcomes at The Artground.

Photos courtesy of Yamaguchi Center of Arts and Media [YCAM]
The rolling hills

Each of Daiya’s designs has a unique feature – the rolling hills. He believes that children (and even adults) are the happiest when coming down an incline. It was truly a great experience for the whole family. There were various points of access for children of all ages. We started by adding different textures on the the top surface of the structure, which gave colour and a different sensation to the space.

Physical Activity

The whole arts space looks and feels like a mini skate park. It challenges children and their parents to reach for the extremes, and it’s always tremendous adrenaline and fun on the way down! We love watching parents play such an active role in engaging with their children.

Interactive Media Points

There are various interactive media points scattered throughout the arts space. It really takes a curious mind to figure out what and where these are. Things are never what they seem like at Rolling @ TAG, and are often connected through sensors, microphones, speakers and screens! 
 

Giving them a sense of ownership through Kids Meetings

Besides the free exploratory nature of the arts space that encourages curiosity, the designed experience also highlights responsibility and socially progressive behaviour in young children. We’ve organised Kids Meetings as part of this arts space, where children’s voices are heard and realised into new additions for the space. With this chance to implement real change, it gives the children a sense of ownership and responsibility towards the arts space; in return, friendships are founded through this experience! It was both a unique experience for the children as well as the artist and The Artground Team, to come up with creative ideas on how to make the children’s ideas come alive!

Rolling @ TAG goes to TPC

We were very pleased that Guoco Towers, previously known as Tanjong Pagar Centre (TPC) came on board to adopt the entire arts space of Rolling @ TAG and house it at their outdoor venue. This extended the life of the structures while allowing more children and working adults to enjoy the space. It acted as a gathering point for those working around the area during the weekdays, and over the weekends many young families came to spend their time there.